career

Book Review: The Art of Non-Conformity by Chris Guillebeau

AONC book coverA guy I know once said: "If you follow the herd, you'll end up as lunch." (Actually, he said "Schnitzel", since he's German, but you get the idea).

Well, here's a guide, a manual if you wish, for avoiding the fate of leading a dull, boring and unremarkable life. This is not just a self-help or success guide type of book, it's much more. It's a manifesto for personal freedom that can apply to all of us, if we choose to follow it.

In some ways, it's like the red pill/blue pill thing from The Matrix: Do you want to stay in the normal world, do normal, boring things like getting a job, applying for a mortgage, going on vacation once or twice a year, and feeding the ducks in the park after you retire?

Or do you want to decide for yourself what to do with your life, create your own rules and live your life the way you want?

How to Add Creativity to Your Technology Career and Save Yourself from Automation and Outsourcing

In a recent blog article about the future of IT admins, my MUCOSUG-Buddy Wolfgang wondered whether the new generation of self-managed, appliance-like systems like Oracle Exadata, Oracle Sun Storage 7000 and their friends from other vendors are making IT personnel redundant, or what kind of jobs IT people are supposed to be doing in the future.

This reminded me of Dan Pink's book "A Whole New Mind" (Amazon.com|co.uk|de, BooksOnBoard). Pink argues that today's "left-brainish" jobs are threatened by "abundance, automation and Asia" (the latter really meaning "outsourcing") and that today's knowledge workers need to learn how to better employ their "right-brain" and add creativity to their jobs, as a new competitive differentiator.

How does this relate to Technology or IT jobs?