General

General blog topics that don't fit into a special category.

The ProBlogger 7 Links Challenge #7links

7Links.jpg

Darren from ProBlogger today posted his 7 Link Challenge. A fun idea in which he asks bloggers to share 7 links to posts, based on the 7 criteria he selected.

ProBlogger is a great website with lots of useful tips for bloggers. Even if you don't plan to make money with your blog, or if you don't think of yourself as a pro blogger, this site is still one of the best in terms of blogging advice.

I'm currently reading his book "ProBlogger" (affiliate link) and I can highly recommend it to anyone who is thinking more seriously about blogging.

Now, let's get started with the ProBlogger 7 Link Challenge for Constant Thinking:

The War Between Quality and Popularity

Star Wars (Sorry for the pun :) )

War is waging in the galaxy. This time it's not the Rebels against the Empire, or Good vs. Evil.

No, this war is different, and it has been going on ever since products designs companies entities existed.

What I mean is the war between Quality and Popularity.

Let me explain:

(Drumroll, Roman fanfare, then dramatic Anime action trailer a la Mortal Kombat, etc.)

As of May 21st, Google officially declared war on the Apple iPhone.

Sure, there was some teasing here and there for weeks, if not months, but this is serious.

10 Ways To Thank A Blogger Without Using Flattr

Tipping

One of the web 2.0 startup hypes du jour is called Flattr. It's a micro-payment service that enables readers to allocate a monthly budget they can use to "flattr" blog posts and other content by clicking a simple badge. The monthly flat-rate is then distributed to the "flattred" authors as a way of appreciation.

More on that in this short video.

A lot of people are jumping on the Flattr bandwagon, and of course, rewarding creators is always goodness.

But I'm not convinced.

Why? Because IMHO there's no need for a middle man handling the "Thank You" transaction between a blogger (or other content creator) and the reader (or other content consumer).

Instead, here are ten (10) better ways to accomplish the same thing (supporting your favorite creator). They can involve money or not - you choose - and in each of them, everybody wins.

Spring Cleaning Part 2: Clearing Up Your Home Directory

My empty OpenSolaris Desktop at work.

Yesterday, I cleaned up my home directory at work. I went from ca. 15 GB of data down to 1.1 GB. And I only stopped there, because I didn't want to spend too much more time cleaning up. Here's how to do it.

In the previous post of this mini-series, we looked at why it's important to have our emails and files organized, then attacked our INBOX to reach zero-message-nirvana. I'm happy to see that others are living by these principles, too. Thanks, Gregor!

Now let's look at that other dark spot in our IT lives: Our Desktop and file system. If you're like me, you see this very often, too: Cluttered desktops with so many files and folders and downloads and icons and stuff, you can barely make out the underlying desktop background.

Spring Cleaning Part 1: How to Tidy Up Your Email INBOX and File Email Away in One Keystroke

A tidy desktop with a zero email INBOX

Spring's around the corner and the Easter weekend is upon us, giving us some time to sit back, relax and do some spring cleaning!

This also applies to your data, in particular your Email folders and your home directories. In this two-part series, we'll clean up our email INBOX to zero (yes: null, nada, zip) emails, simplify email folders, then clean up our home directory file structure. That'll save us time, help us find peace of mind and make us more efficient so we can concentrate our energies on what really matters to us.

How to Add Creativity to Your Technology Career and Save Yourself from Automation and Outsourcing

In a recent blog article about the future of IT admins, my MUCOSUG-Buddy Wolfgang wondered whether the new generation of self-managed, appliance-like systems like Oracle Exadata, Oracle Sun Storage 7000 and their friends from other vendors are making IT personnel redundant, or what kind of jobs IT people are supposed to be doing in the future.

This reminded me of Dan Pink's book "A Whole New Mind" (Amazon.com|co.uk|de, BooksOnBoard). Pink argues that today's "left-brainish" jobs are threatened by "abundance, automation and Asia" (the latter really meaning "outsourcing") and that today's knowledge workers need to learn how to better employ their "right-brain" and add creativity to their jobs, as a new competitive differentiator.

How does this relate to Technology or IT jobs?

Welcome to Constant Thinking

Constantin Gonzalez

Dear reader, my name is Constantin Gonzalez, and welcome to Constant Thinking!

This blog is about useful technology for the quality geek. As the name implies, I'm constantly thinking about technology, trying to figure out where it leads to, and how to get the best out of it. I try to learn, create and share useful technology stuff every day.

About the Author

I've been playing with computers since the early 80's, and with Unix and the Internet since the early 90's. I've created and installed websites since 1994, started working for Sun Microsystems in 1998 and as of now, I'm now a Principal Field Technologist at Oracle through their acquisition of Sun.
My job is to provide Technical Expertise to customers in Germany, and help with other customer projects in rest of the world. My focus areas are SPARC processors and systems, Solaris and Cloud Computing.